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Natural Shrimp’s water treatment trial showcases success in Japan

April 29, 2024  By RASTech Staff


(Photo: Natural Shrimp website)

Natural Shrimp, Inc., a biotechnology aquaculture company, has announced it has completed a successful six-month trial in Japan with the company’s patented electrocoagulation (EC) and Hydrogas™ technologies, at the end of February 2024.

The trial compared a tank treated by the EC and Hydrogas with a tank treated by a traditional biofilter. According to Natural Shrimp, during the trial, the EC effectively removed the ammonia from the water and the shrimp growth rate increased during the presence of Hydrogas when compared to the shrimp growth rate in the tank treated only by the biofilter.

“I very much enjoyed working with the team in Japan during the installation and operation of our equipment in the Japanese shrimp research facility. The Japanese quickly learned how to operate the EC and Hydrogas equipment and shared with us the data that they collected during the trial,” said Tom Untermeyer, chief technology officer at Natural Shrimp.

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Natural Shrimp said it made three trips to Japan during the trial period and continued to actively participate in the trial by remote access to the equipment between trips. However, after initial instruction by the NSI team, the Japanese team was able to independently operate the EC and Hydrogas equipment on their own. 

The Japanese team collected data under varying conditions by testing different flow rates, ammonia levels, and amperage levels. Based on the results from the trial, Natural Shrimp said it’s looking to either joint venture, license or form a business combination in Japan.

“The Japanese market is uniquely set up for the NSI technology based on its current shrimp import conditions and a robust consumption of shrimp as a primary protein source. I am excited to see where this will lead us in the future with the hope of helping them and others develop successful shrimp production systems using our technologies,” Untermeyer said.


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